Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Mark Joseph Tovar
Mark Joseph Tovar began his deviant molestation and sexual assault against his step-daughter when she was about seven years old. He intentionally and maliciously abused this young child her entire childhood. He groomed this child by his gradual sexual advances over a period of about 14 years.

He began touching her through her clothes, digitally penetrating her, and ejaculating on her. He performed oral sex on this child and made her perform oral sex on him. This then led to ongoing sexual intercourse and continued into the victim's adult life. This child became pregnant several times wherein she was taken in for abortions to cover up his sick and perverted crime.

When the victim was about 19 years old, she decided to keep the pregnancy and this baby, who through DNA testing was determined to be fathered by the defendant, the victim's step-father. The defendant stole this victim's childhood from her and caused her to live through repeated sexual assaults on a daily basis.

Tovar was convicted of multiple counts of: Molestation of child; sexual conduct with a minor under 15 years old; and sexual conduct with a minor and was sentenced 3/31/2014 to life with no parole until served a minimum of 144 years.

Convicted of:
- Multiple counts of: Molestation of Child
- Sexual Conduct with a Minor under 15 years old
- Sexual Conduct with a Minor.
Sentenced:
Life with no parole until 144 years served.
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. William Hayes
Two juries found William Hayes, 58 years old, guilty of sexual assault, kidnapping, attempted sexual assault, possession of a dangerous drug, and conspiracy to commit tampering with a witness on March 4, 2013 and May 10, 2013.

Hayes assaulted three women over a ten month time frame. He kidnapped an 18 year old female and ordered her to get into his car where he took her to a local park and sexually assaulted her and threatened to shoot her if she resisted. The second victim was also an 18 year old female that had just been involved in a car accident wherein she stopped at a convenience store to call family for help. Defendant approached her and offered to help her with her car and a lawyer. After taking her to his apartment, he threatened her with a gun and sexually assaulted her. Several months later, Hayes took advantage of a 20 year old female who was developmentally disabled. He took her to his apartment and sexually assaulted her.

The third victim called 911 immediately after the attack. A search warrant was issued for the defendant’s apartment where methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia was discovered.

While Hayes was awaiting trial, he conspired with another woman to try to prevent the third victim from testifying against him. He gave this woman a description of the victim and where she could be located. He also asked the woman to contact his attorney and the prosecutor and to lie and say that the third victim knew him and that the sexual encounter had been consensual. William Hayes was sentenced to 31.5 years on June 10, 2013 for these crimes.

Convicted of:
Sexual assault, kidnapping, attempted sexual assault, possession of a dangerous drug, and conspiracy to commit tampering with a witness
Sentenced:
31.5 years in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Jonathan George Baumbach
Jonathan Baumbach, 28 years old, pled guilty to second-degree murder and kidnapping on February 11, 2013 and received a sentence of 31 years. Baumbach was offered a plea in order to spare the victim’s family from reliving the violent death of their loved one in a trial.

Defendant lured the victim into thinking that he was going to give him a present but had to be blindfolded before he would give it to him. Once the victim was blindfolded, Baumbach viciously bashed the victim in the head and crushed his skull with a hammer.

Baumbach left the victim’s home for a short while only to return and find that his victim was not dead and had crawled into the bathroom. He then brutally struck the victim again in the head with the hammer and slit his throat to ensure his death. He attempted to hide this heinous crime by pouring bleach over the victim’s body and taping the vents shut in the bathroom in order to hide the smell of a decomposing body.

Defendant stole the victim’s credit cards and truck and headed to Las Vegas where he caroused for several days before landing in Washington, where he was arrested and returned to Tucson. The victim was killed only because he confronted Baumbach and his lover for partying at his home and he had asked them to leave.

Convicted of:
Second-degree murder, kidnapping
Sentenced:
31 years in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Glen Cusford Francis
More than twenty years after the brutal and senseless murder of a Muslim cleric in Tucson, law enforcement officers and prosecutors reopened the unsolved case and began reexamining the evidence. Using modern DNA testing on physical evidence collected long before such testing was available, investigators identified Glen Francis as the likely perpetrator of the crime.

The victim was a religious leader and the imam of a Tucson mosque. Because some of his teachings were controversial, he had made enemies within the Muslim community and had previously received numerous death threats. His body was discovered in the kitchen of the mosque in 1990. He had been severely beaten, stabbed 29 times, and drenched in a flammable liquid. His killer had then turned on the four gas burners on the stove in an apparent effort to burn the body and destroy evidence of the crime.

Francis was eventually linked to the 20-year-old murder through fingerprints from the mosque and blood samples from the victim’s coat. Detectives learned that Francis had come to Tucson from Trinidad for the express purpose of killing the victim because of his controversial religious views. Using the alias “Benjamin Phillips,” Francis had obtained an Arizona driver’s license, rented an apartment, gotten a job, and even joined the victim’s religious community to become familiar with imam’s schedule and the layout of the mosque.

After the murder, using several different assumed names, Francis had left the country in 1991, returned several years later, then at some point moved to Canada, where he was found and arrested by Canadian officials in 2009. Extradited to Arizona in 2011, Francis was eventually tried for his vicious crime. A Tucson jury found him guilty of premeditated, first-degree murder. In January 2013, he was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole for at least 25 years.

Convicted of:
First-degree murder
Sentenced:
Life in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Frank Alexander Romero
In June 2010, two people out for an early-morning walk found the nude body of a woman lying face-down in a baseball field at Freedom Park in Tucson. Her death had been a traumatic one: an autopsy determined that she had been badly beaten, strangled, sodomized, and raped.

As police officers were investigating the scene, they noticed Romero at a distance. He was washing his hands in a drinking fountain at the park, and he had what appeared to be blood on his shoes and under his fingernails. Romero denied knowing the victim, but he identified a broken, bloodied watch found near her body as his. A full investigation yielded considerable evidence linking Romero to the crime. DNA testing revealed that the blood on his shoes and the handle of the fountain where he washed his hands matched the victim's blood. His DNA was found in evidence collected from her body. And surveillance footage shot only hours before the body was discovered shows Romero wearing the t-shirt that was later found near the victim's body, stained with her blood.

In November 2012, a Pima County jury found Romero guilty of first-degree murder and two counts of sexual assault. He was sentenced in January 2013 to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Convicted of:
First-degree murder and two counts of sexual assault
Sentenced:
Life in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Michael Jonathon Carlson
Michael Carlson was a 52-year-old parole absconder from the State of Texas. Shortly after arriving in Arizona in May 2009, he began living on a property in Marana where Kenneth Alliman and Rebecca Lofton also were living. Around May 25, 2009, Carlson told Alliman and Lofton to get in his car, where he later shot them both with a sawed-off shotgun. He disposed of their bodies by burning them in trash pits on the Marana property.

Taken into custody in June on the parole-violation charges, Carlson confessed to the murders of Alliman and Lofton. Detectives recovered the sawed-off shotgun from a trailer on the property where Carlson had been staying. They also located the burn pits on the same property and eventually identified fragmented remains of both victims in the burned material found in the pits.

In August 2012, a Pima County jury found Carlson guilty of kidnapping and murdering Alliman and Lofton. After a separate penalty-phase trial, the jury determined that death was the appropriate sentence for Carlson. At a sentencing hearing in October 2012, the trial court imposed the death penalty for both murders and imposed consecutive 21-year sentences for each kidnapping count.

Convicted of:
Two counts each of first-degree murder and kidnapping
Sentenced:
Death Penalty
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Kim Wayne Kader
For twenty years, Kim Kader had been a close friend of his young victim's parents. They had invited Kader to share holiday celebrations in their Phoenix-area home and trusted him to housesit when the family was away. Ostensibly to help his friends through a busy and stressful time in the summer of 2010, the 56-year-old Kader invited their 12-year-old son to come and visit him in Tucson. Unemployed, Kader promised to take the boy hiking and swimming and otherwise entertain him over a seven- to ten-day stay.

Instead, Kader showed the boy pornography, molested him repeatedly, forced him into a variety of sexual acts over a period of several days, and at one point even tied the boy up. He also threatened to hurt the victim's mother if the boy told anyone what Kader had done.

When he returned home, the traumatized child revealed the abuse to his family, and Kader was soon arrested. A Pima County jury eventually found Kader guilty of all 12 felony counts on which he had been indicted: kidnapping, luring a minor for sexual exploitation, furnishing obscene or harmful items to a minor, two counts of child molestation, and seven counts of sexual conduct with a minor. In October 2012, Kader was sentenced to serve a minimum of 262 years in prison.

Convicted of:
Multiple counts of sexual conduct with a minor, child molestation, kidnapping, and other felonies
Sentenced:
Life in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Guadalupe Marrufo Ontiveros
Guadalupe Ontiveros is a serial--and dangerous--armed robber. In March 2003, he and two accomplices committed four separate armed robberies in less than two days. As a result, Ontiveros was charged with multiple counts of armed robbery, aggravated robbery, and aggravated assault. He pled guilty to three of those felonies and, in August 2003, was sentenced to prison for 8.5 years.

Soon after being paroled on those convictions in 2010, Ontiveros absconded from parole. In mid-December 2010, he robbed a local business by threatening the employee on duty with a handgun. On January 3 and January 5, 2011, he committed two more robberies, each time again armed with a handgun. On January 31, 2011, he returned to the business he had robbed on January 5. In front of multiple eyewitnesses, he pointed his gun at one of the victims and attempted to shoot. When his weapon did not fire, Ontiveros fled. He was pursued by witnesses, whose observations helped lead to his eventual arrest.

A jury found Ontiveros guilty of all three armed robberies and nine counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. He was sentenced in September 2012 to life in prison, as Arizona law requires for defendants who repetitively commit certain serious offenses. Thirty-three years old at sentencing, Ontiveros has no possibility of early release until he has served at least 25 years in prison.

Convicted of:
3 armed robberies & 9 counts of aggravated assault
Sentenced:
Life in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Robert Charles Glissendorf
A jury in July 2012 found Robert Glissendorf guilty of two counts of child molestation.

One of his victims was his six-year-old niece, whom he had molested between 1997 and 1999, when she was sleeping at the home of a relative.

Roughly ten years later, he molested the five-year-old daughter of his son's girlfriend when that child and her sister likewise were spending the night.

Evidence at trial included the testimony of a third victim, whom Glissendorf had molested decades earlier in Nevada in 1976, when she, too, was only six years old.

The trial court sentenced Glissendorf to prison for 34 years, which he must serve day-for-day. Fifty-seven years old at the time of sentencing, Glissendorf will not be eligible for release until he is 91 years old.

Convicted of:
2 counts of child molestation
Sentenced:
34 years in prison to be served day-for-day
Case Profile

Convictions Convictions
State v. Orel and Christian Vasquez
On an August night in 2009, 15-year-old Brenda Arenas, her boyfriend, and her three-year-old sister were passengers in a car driven by Brenda's mother. Traveling in a residential area, they were unaware that they were approaching the scene of a violent home invasion that was still in progress. As they reached that particular house, several armed, masked men came running from the house into the street. The men blocked the victims' path, forced them to stop, and surrounded their car. One of the men, 19-year-old Orel Vasquez, began banging on the driver's side window with an AK-47 assault rifle, which discharged into the car. With an explosion of glass, the bullet shattered the driver's closed window and struck Brenda in the head. She was transported to a hospital where she was pronounced dead. The next morning would have been the first day of her sophomore year of high school.

Orel Vasquez's companions that night included his 25-year-old brother Christian, who was armed with a semiautomatic handgun. The Vasquez brothers were identified as suspects within two weeks of committing the crimes but fled to Mexico where they had relatives. Eventually, in January 2011, they turned themselves in to U.S. authorities at the border.

At trial in May 2012, a jury found Orel and Christian guilty of 23 felony counts each. They were sentenced on July 16, 2012, to life in prison for the first-degree murder of Brenda Arenas, followed by consecutive sentences totaling 189 years each for their remaining 22 felony convictions.

Both convicted of:
1st degree murder and 22 other felonies
Sentenced:
Life in prison, followed by consecutive sentences totaling 189 years each.
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Angel Perez
In May 2012, Angel Antonio Perez, age 22, was sentenced to life in prison for first-degree murder. He was just 19 years old when he fired the fatal shot but already had an extensive criminal history.

He had been arrested for the first time at age 13. Over the next five years, Perez was referred to juvenile court a dozen times and adjudicated delinquent on four of those occasions. When he failed to comply with the conditions of his intensive probation, he was committed to the Department of Juvenile Corrections.

He was first criminally charged as an adult for an aggravated robbery he committed on his 19th birthday in October 2008. Released on bail while awaiting trial, he committed eight new felonies over the next seven months and was indicted four more times in 2008 and 2009. He eventually accepted a plea agreement covering all five cases. In March 2010, he was sentenced to 14.5 years in prison for the six felonies he admitted under the plea agreement.

In the meantime, he had been identified as one of two masked men who had gone to a home in June 2009 intending to steal a quantity of marijuana from a father and son. Armed with a handgun, Perez shot the older man, who later died of his injuries. Perez was charged with first-degree murder and two counts of attempted armed robbery. A jury found him guilty of all three counts. Under the combined sentences imposed by the court, Perez has no chance of parole until he has served at least 57 years in prison.
Convicted of:
1st degree murder, 2 counts of attempted armed robbery.
Sentenced:
57 yrs to life in prison
Convictions
State v. Felix
Louis John Felix was first sentenced to prison in 2007 at age 19. While still on parole from those convictions, he committed three new felonies in 2010: second-degree burglary, theft of a means of transportation, and possession of burglary tools. A jury found him guilty of those crimes in July 2011 at a trial Felix did not attend. He had been released on bond while awaiting trial and then failed to appear in court as ordered. As a result, a warrant had issued for his arrest, and two bail bondsmen were actively searching for him.

On July 29, 2011, the bondsmen tracked Felix to a hotel near Interstate 10 and to the room where he was staying with his girlfriend and her six-year-old son. When the bondsmen ordered Felix to come out, he shot at them instead. By the time Sheriff's deputies and members of the SWAT team arrived, Felix had barricaded himself in the room, along with his girlfriend and her child. During the long standoff that followed, Interstate 10 was closed for several hours, and Felix fired another shot from the room that struck an officer's helmet.

After more than eight hours, Felix finally surrendered and was taken into custody. A jury found him guilty of kidnapping, multiple counts of endangerment and disorderly conduct, and illegal possession of a weapon. In May 2012, he was sentenced to a total of 32 years in prison.
Convicted of:
Kidnapping, multiple counts of endangerment and disorderly conduct, illegal possession of a weapon
Sentenced:
32 yrs in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Quijada
In October 2009, a woman walking home alone was accosted by an armed stranger. Holding the gun to her side, the man grabbed her arm and forced her to a nearby lot where there was an abandoned house. There he sexually assaulted her at gunpoint then fled the scene. The victim underwent a medical examination following the assault, and the DNA of an unidentified male was collected from her body.

More than a year later, Alfredo Quijada was convicted and sentenced for an auto theft he committed in November 2009. As a result of that conviction, authorities obtained a sample of his DNA, which was eventually matched to the DNA recovered from the sexual assault victim. After the DNA match had been verified, the victim independently identified Quijada in a lineup as the man who had attacked her the previous year.

A jury found Quijada guilty of kidnapping, assault, and two counts of sexual assault. The trial court found he had three prior felony convictions and was on probation when he committed his latest crimes at age 22. On April 30, 2012, the court ordered him to register as a sex offender and sentenced him to prison for 84 years.
Convicted of:
Kidnapping, assault, and two counts of sexual assault
Sentenced:
84 yrs in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Brown
Heulon Brown was one of four masked, hooded men who stormed into a Tucson apartment in August 2010, reportedly intending to steal marijuana. Only 21 years old at the time, Brown was already on probation for a previous felony conviction in another state.

Inside the apartment were four victims. Two were pistol whipped, and a third was thrown to the floor and threatened before the intruders and one of the victims exchanged gunfire. Four people were shot. Two victims, including a fourteen-year-old boy, were shot multiple times. They survived, although the minor victim was gravely injured. Brown and an accomplice also were shot, and the accomplice died of his injuries.

A jury found Brown guilty of 11 felony charges, including first-degree felony murder and multiple counts of armed robbery and aggravated assault. In April 2012, the court sentenced him to life in prison, with no possibility of release for at least 25 years.
Convicted of:
1st degree felony murder and multiple counts of armed robbery and aggravated assault
Sentenced:
Life in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Olivas
First arrested at age 9, Gilbert Gonzales Olivas had an extensive juvenile record by the time he was 16, when he was ordered to stand trial as an adult for burglary and auto theft. He was convicted, and in August 1996 the court placed him on three years' intensive probation. He violated his probation within a matter of weeks and was then sentenced to prison for three years.

Nine months after being released from prison in December 1998, Olivas committed armed robbery, aggravated assault, first-degree burglary, unlawful use of a vehicle, and escape. He was found guilty of those crimes and sent back to prison in March 2000 for 10.5 years.

Shortly after his release on community supervision following that sentence, Olivas was stopped in December 2008 driving a stolen pickup truck. He was charged with four new felonies, including resisting arrest and endangering lives by driving recklessly through a busy parking lot while trying to avoid apprehension. After spending months in jail awaiting trial on those charges, Olivas posted bond in July 2010. Four days later, he and two companions committed armed robbery, aggravated robbery, two aggravated assaults, and vehicle theft.

Despite Olivas's attempts (first by offering payment, then through intimidation) to keep his victims from testifying against him, a jury found him guilty of his latest dangerous felonies. On March 27, 2012, the court sentenced him to prison for 35 years.
Convicted of:
Armed robbery, aggravated robbery,
2 aggravated assaults, and vehicle theft
Sentenced:
35 years in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Wojcik
Richard Wojcik and the victim had once been romantically involved and had lived together in the victim's home. She first obtained a protective order against him in October 2007, after he had hit her and threatened to harm her and her daughter. The pair reconciled, but Wojcik assaulted the victim again in February 2008. He later pled guilty to a felony charge of aggravated domestic violence with two or more previous convictions. He was sentenced to prison for nine months in July 2008.

Soon after his release, Wojcik again harassed and threatened the victim. Over a two-day period, he telephoned her 15-20 times, threatening to kill her and her daughter, burn down her home, and damage her vehicle. As she left work on one of those days, she found that her car had been spray-painted and her tires slashed -- acts Wojcik later admitted. He pled guilty to another charge of aggravated domestic violence and was returned to prison in March 2009 for a 1.5-year term.

As his release date approached, the victim applied for another order of protection, believing Wojcik was still a threat to her daughter and herself. On September 3, 2010, a police officer served the order on Wojcik after he had been found first in the victim's backyard and then lingering in her neighborhood. Less than an hour after being escorted to his own residence by the officer, Wojcik returned to the victim's home, broke a sliding glass door to gain entrance, and fatally stabbed the victim in the chest. A jury found Wojcik guilty of first-degree murder, aggravated domestic violence, and other crimes. He was sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison.
Convicted of:
1st degree murder, aggravated domestic violence
Sentenced:
Life in prison
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Kreus
One morning in January 2010, 42-year-old Timothy Kreus approached a fifteen-year-old girl who was walking to catch a school bus. Pulling a gun from his pocket, he ordered her into his white pickup truck. Instead, the girl turned and ran toward home. A witness saw Kreus chase the victim briefly on foot then get into his truck after abandoning the chase. The victim was able to describe to sheriff's deputies the black hoodie Kreus was wearing and the white truck.

Less than three weeks later, at a different time of day in a different part of town, Kreus briefly abducted another fifteen- year-old girl as she walked home from school. After accosting his second victim from behind, he dragged her to his truck, forced her inside, and began driving. The victim struggled vigorously. After Kreus punched her in the face, she hit him back and even managed to honk the truck's horn with her foot. Eventually Kreus opened the passenger door and pushed her out. When Tucson police officers arrested him two weeks later and searched the white truck, they found a black hoodie, a loaded semiautomatic handgun, pornographic magazines, and other items the second victim had reported seeing in the truck. In addition, DNA recovered from her fingernails matched Kreus's DNA.

Astute detective work and cooperation between the Tucson Police and Pima County Sheriff's Departments provided the crucial link between the two cases. After TPD had identified Kreus through his DNA, the similarities between the two cases led sheriff's detectives to include Kreus's photograph in an array of photos shown to the first victim, who identified Kreus as the man who had approached and chased her.

A jury found Kreus guilty of kidnapping, attempted kidnapping, assault, and aggravated assault. At his sentencing in November 2011, the court noted his lengthy criminal history and multiple prior convictions for dangerous offenses before sentencing Kreus to life in prison with no possibility of parole for a minimum of 57 years.

Convicted of:
Kidnapping and aggravated assault
Sentenced:
57 yrs in Prison
Case Profile

Convictions Convictions Convictions
State v. Romero, Bland, Mejia
On a July afternoon in 2010, two armed men--Christopher Romero and Rashad Bland--forced their way into a Tucson apartment where an 11-year-old boy was watching television in the living room while his mother and aunt folded laundry in the bedroom. A third woman was also present. In the living room, Bland and Romero pointed handguns at the boy's mother and demanded money and drugs. One of them ordered the other two women onto the floor in th bedroom. The men eventually fled with the first victim's purse and personal items.

After waiting, that victim went outside. She saw Bland, Romero, and a third man, Manuel Mejia, driving away. She noted the license plate number of the car and called 9-1-1. Police officers quickly located the vehicle, stopped it, and arrested Bland and Romero without incident. Mejia attempted to flee on foot with the victim's purse, but he was soon apprehended nearby. The officers recovered the purse and two loaded, semiautomatic handguns. In the car, they also found black hats, gloves, and a pair of handcuffs that had not been used in this home invasion.

A jury found Romero guilty of ten felonies. In July 2011, the court sentenced him to a total of 20 years in prison. Bland pled guilty to two dangerous-nature felonies and was sentenced to 10.5 years in prison in this case; he is currently awaiting sentencing for another dangerous felony in a separate case. Mejia was convicted of three felonies and sentenced to prison for 7 years.





Convicted of:
Romero-1st Degree Murder (above)

Bland- 2 dangerous felonies
(center)

Mejia- 3 felonies (bottom)
Sentenced:
Romero received 20 yrs in prison

Bland received 10.5 yrs in prison

Mejia received 7 yrs in prison

Case Profile

Salabarria Aguayo
State v. Salabarria and Aguayo  
In July 2009, 33-year-old Ron Salabarria and 23-year-old Jorge Aguayo formed a plan to rob a neighbor in the mobile home park where they had been staying. Salabarria was to restrain the 60-year-old victim while Aguayo searched his residence for money and property to steal. As Aguayo was searching, he heard and saw Salabarria hit the victim with a flashlight.

Two days later, concerned neighbors found the victim lying dead on the floor of his ransacked residence. He had sustained multiple cuts on his scalp, and an autopsy revealed the cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head. Witnesses told officers that Salabarria and Aguayo had admitted having pepper-sprayed, robbed, and beaten the victim.

Aguayo turned himself in the day after the victim was found. He later pled guilty to manslaughter and first-degree burglary. After a jury trial, Salabarria was found guilty of first-degree murder, first-degree burglary, armed robbery, and aggravated robbery. The convictions were the latest in a lengthy criminal history that included 35 prior misdemeanor convictions and two previous felony convictions. Seventeen of the 35 misdemeanors and both of the felonies were violent offenses.

On October 11, the trial court sentenced Salabarria to spend the rest of his life in prison. Aguayo was sentenced in September 2011 to consecutive prison terms totaling 14.5 years.
Convicted of:
Salabarria-1st-degree murder, burglary, armed robbery, aggravated robbery

Aguayo-Manslaughter, 1st-degree burglary
Sentenced:
Salabarria received life in prison
(pictured above)

Aguayo received 14.5 yrs (pictured below)
Case Profile

Convictions
State v. Garcia
In December 2005, a local college student living near campus awoke in her bedroom to find Manuel Garcia on top of her, yelling at her to wake up, asking her where "Sam" was, and claiming Sam owed him money. Garcia covered the victim's face with blankets and sexually assaulted her. He then took her cell phone and fled. Investigators summoned to the scene found a shoe print in the shower and tracks in an adjacent alley.

In June 2007, another female college student, also living near campus, awoke to find Garcia in her room, pointing a gun at her and asking her where "Mark" was. Garcia put a comforter over her head and sexually assaulted her multiple times, then forced her into a closet before leaving with her cell phone. Investigators at that scene found shoe tracks in the alley and fingerprints inside the house. The victim also described to police a distinctive tattoo she had observed on her assailant's left wrist.

In December 2007, a local database linked the two cases together. In 2009, DNA linked Garcia to the crimes. He was arrested and charged with 19 counts of burglary, sexual assault, kidnapping, and aggravated assault. Garcia was convicted on all counts and was sentenced in 2010 to prison terms totaling 544 years.
Convicted of:
Burglary, sexual assault, kidnapping, and aggravated assault
Sentenced:
544 yrs in Prison
32 N. Stone Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85701